Calls for papers

Call for papers: "Prizes and Virtues: An Interdisciplinary Workshop" (Rome, April 10-11, 2017)

“PRIZES AND VIRTUES: AN INTERDISCIPLINARY WORKSHOP”
LUMSA University, Rome – April 10-11, 2017

To an economist, a prize, such as a golden medal, is merely a special type of incentive. Any other kind of social scientist would be perplexed by thinking of the Nobel Prize, or of the Medal of Honour, in these terms. In contemporary neoclassical economics, the concept of incentive is a primitive, similar to that of “utility”, “price”, “production” or “consumption”, that all economists use but none feels the need to define: it is a foundation, or a corner stone, of the science of economics. However, if we tried to articulate what economists mean by incentives, we would probably find that they are considered as any “motivation” for adhering to and for complying with some form of contract. Once incentives are intended in this all-embracing way, it immediately follows that prizes and awards are considered simply as their sub-set. Yet many real world prizes and awards do not follow this contractarian, consequentialist logic and cannot be understood within this framework. A more complex understanding of human motivation–we believeis needed to hold that prizes are indeed not incentives.

This search cannot ignore the history of economic and philosophical ideals. Competing theories of action and motivation were central topics of debate among eighteenth century philosophers. David Hume, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and Adam Smith’s theories implied much more complex social and economic motivations than mere self-interest, which can be opportunely diverted through an appropriate incentive. Within the Italian school of civil economy, Pietro Verri and Antonio Genovesi elaborated on the unintended consequences of public and institutional actions on individuals’ behaviour. In the same line, Giacinto Dragonetti debated (at a distance) with Cesare Beccaria on the nature and effectiveness of punishments and awards in shaping agents’ choices, both in private and public contexts. From the mid XIX century onward, economists became those social scientists most characterized by the purest anthropology (i.e. that of a human being acting in order to maximize individual utili!
 ty), endorsing utilitarian philosophy and sacrificing previously complex understanding of human actions. In the XX century, microeconomics has continued this process of anthropological reductionism: management theory, as well as agency and contract theory, have distilled the all-embracing theory of incentives.

In the last three decades, behavioural and experimental economics are undermining from within this reductionist model of human behaviour. By taking serious account of concepts such as reciprocity, intrinsic motivation, inequality aversion, and fairness, they are making more complex interpretations of human action and motivation central again, albeit still within the utilitarian framework. In addition, there is an important contemporary philosophical stream of inquiry, the so-called virtue ethics, which competes with utilitarianism yet remains almost unknown to the economic profession. We argue that this research may provide further insights into human action, which seem otherwise intractable within the current anthropological framework, and can cast a new light on the nature and working of prizes as fundamentally different from incentives. In particular, prizes may well suit the rewarding of virtues, because incentive are known to be liable to cause motivation crowding-out.

To advance our understanding of the economics of prizes, awards and their link with virtues,we warmly invite economists, historians, philosophers, scholars in organization and management and other social scientists to answer to this call and submit an extended abstract (max 1000 words).

Keynote speakers:
– Robert Dur, Erasmus University Rotterdam (Economics)
– Bruno Frey, University of Basel (Behavioural Science)
– Ruth Grant, Duke University (Political Science)

“Pier Luigi Porta” Award:
Heirs will honour the memory of the past Heirs’ President Professor Pier Luigi Porta by a special award to the best paper presented at this conference, a stream of research strongly supported by him before dying. Heirs invites all under fourty scholars to apply for this special “Pier Luigi Porta Award”. The award consist in 2500 euro plus travel cost and accomodation for the conference. The prize will be assigned during the social dinner.

Deadline for submissions of extended abstracts (max 1000 words):
February 15th, 2017 (acceptance date: February 25th, 2017)
to: heirs.unimib@gmail.com

Organization committee: HEIRS & LUMSA University
Luigino Bruni (LUMSA), Vittorio Pelligra (U. Cagliari), Tommaso Reggiani (LUMSA),     Matteo Rizzolli (LUMSA), Alessandra Smerilli (LUMSA).

Contacts:
heirs.unimib@gmail.com


Call for proposals and submissions: The first PPE Society Meeting, March 17-19, 2017

Mark D. White

From the Philosophy, Politics, and Economics (PPE) Society, an announcement and call:

We are planning our first stand-alone PPE Society Meeting for March 17-19 2017 in New Orleans.  With that event in mind we are now doing a CALL FOR PROPOSALS and SUBMISSIONS.

On the proposals side, if you have ideas for panels, or speakers, that you would like to organize, please write up the proposal, with a justification articulating its relevance to PPE, and submit it using the form below.

On the submissions side, if you have a paper you would like to present, please write up an abstract, making sure that it is anonymized, and submit it using the form below.

We have not yet set a deadline for submissions, but if you have an idea for a talk now, letting us know what it is ASAP would be tremendously helpful in our planning for this event.

The submission site can be found here.


Call for papers: 3rd International Conference Economic Philosophy (Aix-en-Provence, June 2016)

Mark D. White

Here's a upcoming conference that may be of interest (apologies for the wonky formatting) -- many more details here.

 

The 3rd International Conference Economic Philosophy will be held in Aix-en-Provence on June 15-16, 2016.

It is organized by GREQAMin collaboration with the Philosophy-Economics Network, theInternational Network for Economic Method (INEM) and the Charles Gide Association for study of Economic Thought.

The focus of this international conference is “The economic agent and its representation(s). We support all contributors working on this topic to submit papers relevant to the theme. Other contributions from economic philosophy are welcome.

The program will consist of both contributed papers and keynote lectures given by:

-         Daniel Hausman, University of Wisconsin-Madison

-         Cristina Bicchieri, University of Pennsylvania

-         John B. Davis, Marquette University and Amsterdam University

The full call for papers is available here.

 

Important dates

February 28: Deadline for submissions (thematic sessions only)
March 15: Deadline for submissions (regular sessions)
April 15: Notification to authors

Until May 2: Registration

May 15Full paper submission deadline
June 15-16: Conference

 For more details, submission and registration, please visit the conference website http://ecophilo.greqam.fr

 

We look forward to meeting you in Aix,
 
The Conference organizing and scientific committees

(Apologies for cross-posting)

 

Call for abstracts: Conference, "Economics and Psychology in Historical Perspective"

Mark D. White

Conference call for contributions

Economics and psychology in historical perspective

(from 18th century to the present)

Paris, December 17th - December 19th 2014

Organized by Mikaël Cozic (UPEC, IUF & IHPST, France) and Jean-Sébastien Lenfant (U. Lille 1, France)

 

IMPORTANT DATES:

Notification of interest: June 10th 2014

Deadline for abstract:  July 10th 2014

Notification of acceptance: August 31th 2014

Full paper: December 1st 2014

 

SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE:

Erik Angner (George Mason university, USA), Richard Arena (Université de Nice Sophia-Antipolis), Laurie Bréban (Université Paris 8, France), Luigino Bruni (Università Lumsa a Roma, Italy), Annie L. Cot (Université Paris 1, France), Agnès Festré (Université de Picardie Jules Verne, France), Till Grüne Yanoff (Royal Institute of Technology, KTH, Sweden), Alessandro Innocenti (Università di Siena, Italy), Ivan Moscati (Insubria University, Italy), Annika Wallin (Lunds Universitet, Sweden).

CONFIRMED INVITED SPEAKERS:

Philippe MONGIN (CNRS & HEC Paris, France), Floris HEUKELOM (U. Nijmegen, Netherdlands), Robert SUGDEN (University of East Anglia, United Kingdom).

CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS

“Psychology is evidently at the basis of political economy and, in general, of all the social sciences. A day will come when we will be able to deduce the laws of the social science from the principles of psychology” (Pareto, Manual of Political Economy, 1909, II, §1)

Neoclassical economics was built upon a theory of rational behavior that pretended to be independent from psychological foundations. Actually, Pareto, who has been instrumental in laying the foundations of modern utility and rational choice theory, uphold that economics and psychology needed to develop separately and that the hopes for reconciling psychology, economics and sociology in the social sciences “still remain some way off”.

Over thirty years or so, an important part of economics has been oriented towards realizing Pareto’s prophecy that a day would come when economics and psychology would benefit from reconciling each others, opening the way for a better understanding of individual and collective behaviors. This reconciliation comes after a period of time during which economics has developed its tools and principles away from psychology (or so the standard narrative argues), on the mere assumption that rational behavior could be described satisfactorily with a well-behaved utility function. For many economists, the offspring of this collective effort is called “behavioral economics”, and it is sometimes viewed a new paradigm in economics, providing tools and principles that may be applied to different fields of economic inquiry (finance, development economics, game theory, etc.).

Basics of behavioral economics are now part of any curricula in economics. The advent of behavioral economics has often been associated with a story-telling argument about its early development in the 1970s and its establishment, focusing on three main points: 1) the legitimization of experimental methods in economics; 2) the usefulness of concepts and ideas borrowed from psychology to increase the explanatory or predictive power of the theory of rational behavior; 3) the advent of a renewed view of human behavior and hence of new ideas in normative economics.

Actually, Pareto’s opening quotation reminds us also that psychology (in different guises) has been a fundamental issue for economists even since 18th century, if only because economists have usually grounded their own theory of economics on some ideas about human nature, and especially on human desires and beliefs.

In recent years, historians of economic thought and theoreticians have shown an interest in understanding the ins and outs of the behavioral turn in economics, and more broadly, on the introduction of psychological elements in economic explanations. Some have focused on recent history, enhancing the different trends of behavioral economics. Others have dealt with the nascent of behavioral economics and the early collaboration between economists and psychologists in the 1950s. Still some others have tried to understand how the marginalist school of thought had relied on the experimental psychology of its time—namely psychophysics—and how it had progressively been expelled out of the realm of economics, at least temporarily, with Pareto and Fisher. However, those contributions have not been coordinated and we are far from having a comprehensive overview of the complex history of the relationships between economics and psychology.

The aim of this conference is to gather contributions from historians of economics and historians of psychology (including cognitive sciences), and also from historically-oriented researchers and philosophers of these disciplines. The overall ambition is to understand the way economics has dealt with psychological arguments, methods and concepts throughout history and to highlight the main debates between economists and psychologists that have fostered and are still fostering behavioral economics. It is hoped that these will pave the way for an overall vision of the history of the relationships between economics and psychology and of the methodological transformations of economics as a discipline.

The organizers wish to limit the number of contributions so that most of the conference will take place in plenary sessions. Interested contributors are asked to indicate their interest in participating to the conference to A COMPLETER. The deadline for submitting an abstract is July 10th 2014. It is hoped that the contributions to the conference will in turn lead to the publication of a comprehensive reference book with short versions of papers and to thematic issues in journals.

Below is a non-exhaustive list of topics, authors and schools of thought:

  • Psychology in economics before the marginalist revolution (Hume, Smith, Condillac, Quesnay)
  • Psychophysics, psychology and the (pre)marginalists (Gossen, Jevons, Walras, Marshall, Edgeworth, Pareto and Fisher, psychology in the Austrian tradition)
  • Psychologists, economists, and the birth and development of experimental psychology (1850-1950)
  • Psychology in the institutionalist and Keynesian schools of thought (Veblen, Mitchell, J.M Clark, Keynes, Duesenberry, Post-Keynesian school).
  • How psychologists came to study decision and choice after World War II (Edwards, Davidson, Luce, Suppes, Siegel, etc).
  • The role and importance of ‘mathematical psychology’ and of the ‘representational theory of measurement’
  • Allais’s paradox and other decision paradoxes from the point of view of economics and psychology.
  • National traditions in the development of “economic psychology” (in relation with social psychology) and early behavioral economics in the USA (Katona, Simon), France, Germany, England, Italy, etc.
  • How psychologists have been involved in the development of behavioral economics and alternative paradigms to study economic behavior (e.g. Kahneman, Tversky, Slovic, Gigerenzer)?
  • Did economics borrow concepts and laws from psychology or did they rather borrow methods?
  • What has been the influence of behavioral sciences, marketing and business studies on the development of behavioral economics?
  • What have been the effects of behavioral economics on public policy? Which role played public policy in the development of behavioral economics?
  • What have been the after effects of behavioral economics on the representation of utility and welfare? (Pigou, Boulding, Scitovsky, Easterlin, Happiness economics)
  • How has behavioral economics come into different fields of economics (finance, development economics, health economics, social choice, public economics, normative economics)?
  • The historical development of neuroeconomics and its links with psychology.
  • The role of normative considerations in the development of behavioral economics, and the links between normative and behavioral economics.


If you are interested in participating in this conference, please send a notification of interest mentioning the theme of your contribution by June 10th 2014 and an abstract of approximately 1000 words prepared for blind review by July 10th 2014. Send your abstract by email at eco-psycho@rationalite.org  with the following information:

Name and surname

Affiliation

Title of your contribution

Abstract


Call for papers: Symposium on "Ethical Limits to Markets" in Moral Philosophy and Politics

Mark D. White

A new call for papers for a special journal issue, highly recommended:

Moral Philosophy & Politics, issue 2016/01 , symposium:

Ethical Limits to Markets

Claims about the dominance or “hegemony” of the market abound in contemporary discourse, yet there remain areas of social life in which goods are not produced and/or allocated via markets. There are also areas of social life in which the use of the market mechanism is contested. The editors of Moral Philosophy and Politics invite high quality submissions that examine questions such as:

- Are there goods that cannot, opposed to should not, be produced and/or allocated via the market?

- What are the characteristics of goods that cannot or should not be bought and sold on markets?

- Is there a “general theory” of limits to markets, or are their limits to be enumerated on a case-by-case basis but not by an all-encompassing theory?

- Are there examples of discourses about the limits to markets in history from which contemporary debates can learn?

- What are the processes through which a given good enters the market domain, having been previously produced or allocated by non-market means?

- What sorts of ethical arguments and sentiments are made or held by lay people who oppose “marketization”?

- What are the processes through which ethical opposition to “marketization” is reduced or broken down?

- To what extent can questions about ethical limits to markets be detached from wider questions about the ethics of “market society” or “capitalism”?

Commentaries and critiques of recent literature on the limits of markets are also welcomed.

Submissions are to be received via the journal’s manuscript submission site (http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/mopp) by 1st January, 2015.

For more information, see the journal's homepage: http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/mopp


Call for papers on Adam Smith for special issue of Filosofia de la Economia

Mark D. White

From the invaluable Heterodox Economics Newsletter comes this call for papers:

Special Issue of the Journal Filosofia de la Economia on “Adam Smith in the history of economic thought and the philosophy of economics”

The Center of Research on Epistemology of Economics (CIECE, School of Economics, University of Buenos Aires) announces a call for papers on the theme “Adam Smith in the history of economic thought and the philosophy of economics” for a special issue of its journal Filosofia de la Economia (Philosophy of Economics). All papers exploring the vast work of Adam Smith on economics, philosophy and other branches of the social sciences are welcome.

Filosofia de la Economia is a trilingual (English, Spanish, Portuguese), peer-reviewed, biannual journal aimed at reaching a broad audience interested in philosophy of economics, methodology and the history of economic thought. The Journal, launched in 2013 and with two issues already published, holds a broad pluralistic view about the discipline and welcomes contributions drawing on the wide range of the different schools of thought. Filosofia de la Economia (ISSN 2314-3592, print; ISSN 2314-3606, online) is available in printed version and electronically.

Contributions to the special issue on Adam Smith must be submitted no later than May 20, 2014.

Guest editors for this issue are Manuel Calderón (manuel.calderon@econo.unlp.edu.ar) and Andrés Lazzarini (alazzarini@gmail.com). Papers must be submitted through its Open Access platform at this website. The special issue will be published in volume 2, no.1, next July 2014.

For more details please contact the guest editors.


Call for papers: 2nd International Conference in “Economic Philosophy”

Mark D. White

 

2nd International Conference “Economic Philosophy”

Strasbourg, October Thursday 9th – Friday 10th October, 2014

ONESELF AND THE OTHER

 Deadline for abstract submissions: 31 January, 2014

 

The 2nd International Conference “Economic Philosophy” will be held at the University of Strasbourg from 9th to 10th October 2014. This conference is organized by the Bureau d’Economie Théorique et Appliquée (BETA, UMR 7522 of CNRS).

This international conference will host sessions on the theme “Oneself and the Other”, but any paper or session which addresses the Philosophy of Economics is welcome.

The Philosophy of Economics primarily considers the economic agent as a moral subject. Economics, however, has long overlooked the agent’s moral—that is to say, reasonable—dimension, to focus instead on the strictly rational. The economic agent refers to “himself” (herself) in terms of his desire and passions, yet also refers to others besides himself. For the rational economic agent, what is the nature of this relationship with the Other? And should it not be understood as undergoing a transformation once we come to consider the economic agent as a reasonable being? Through what process does the Other pass from being an instrument at the disposal of a rational agent to being an end in itself for a moral subject? In other words, how does another become “an Other”?

In the act of producing, the economic agent has friends, masters and subordinates. The acts of exchanging, sharing and borrowing all involve partners. When an economic agent consumes, through the use of goods and services, he depends on other agents of the same kind. Could we claim, then, that in each of these actions there is an encounter with the Other? And would such an encounter not imply, moreover, an acknowledgment of the Other as “my equal”, irrespective of how different they may be? Deprived of the qualities of a moral subject, is the economic agent defined by Economics in a manner sufficient to be seen as a consciousness capable of discovering something within himself, or as a subjectivity capable of experiencing the pain of envy?

Such questions, with which current research is increasingly concerned, lead us to consider the philosophical dimensions of the science of Economics—they lead us, in other words, towards a re-examination of certain fundamental notions, and to a re-reading of certain great authors. It is precisely the study of these notions and these authors which the Colloquium on the Philosophy of Economics invites you to join. Presentations could address the following themes:

- The “just” and the “good” in the economy
- The passions which constitute the economic agent, from Adam Smith to the present
- The role of emotions in economic behaviour
- Economic rationalities
- The Kantian tradition and the question of “the Other”
- Justice and institutions
- Economics and religion
- Reason and the Other
- The question of social preferences
- Evolution of individual preferences: theory and experiments
- The Other and the utilitarian tradition
- Altruism and reciprocity
- Gift and counter-gift
- …

Keynote speakers

Catherine Audard (London School of Economics)
Philippe Mongin (CNRS et HEC)

Scientific committee

Erik Angner (George Mason University, USA)
Claude d’Aspremont (Université catholique de Louvain, Belgique)
Arnaud Berthoud (CLERSE, Université de Lille 1)
Ragip Ege (BETA, Université de Strasbourg)
Ricardo Crespo (Universidad Austral, Argentine)
Rodolphe Dos Santos Ferreira (BETA, Université de Strasbourg)
Samuel Ferey (BETA, Université de Lorraine)
Claude Gamel (GREQAM, Université d’Aix-Marseille)
Jean-Sébastien Gharbi (GREQAM, Université d’Aix-Marseille)
Muriel Gilardone (CREM, Université de Caen Basse-Normandie)
Harald Hagemann (Université de Hohenheim, Allemagne)
Jimena Hurtado (Université de Los Andes, Colombie)
Herrade Igersheim (CNRS et BETA, Université de Strasbourg)
André Lapidus (Phare, Université de Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne)
Maurice Lagueux (Université de Montréal, Canada)
Pierre Livet (CEPERC, Université d’Aix-Marseille)
Patrick Mardellat (CLERSE, Science Po Lille)
Emmanuel Picavet (NOSOPHI, Université de Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne)
Claire Pignol (PHARE, Université de Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne)
Maurice Salles (CREM, Université de Caen Basse-Normandie)
Don Ross (University of Cape Town, Afrique du Sud)

Organization committee

Jean-Daniel Boyer (Culture et Sociétés en Europe, Université de Strasbourg)
Ragip Ege (BETA, Université de Strasbourg)
Samuel Ferey (BETA, Université de Lorraine)
Philippe Gillig (BETA, Université de Strasbourg)
Herrade Igersheim (CNRS et BETA, Université de Strasbourg)
Charlotte Le Chapelain (CLHDPP, Université Lyon 3)
Sylvie Rivot (BETA, Université de Haute Alsace)


Call for papers: Association for Social Economics sessions at Eastern Economic Association meetings

Mark D. White

Submissions are now open for the Association for Social Economics sessions at the 2014 Eastern Economic Association meetings, being held in Boston from March 14-16, 2014.

Individual papers and organized sessions on any topic related to social economics are welcome. As usual, proposals dealing with economics and philosophy are particularly encouraged. All whose proposals are accepted must register for the conference but do not have to pay the paper submission fee.

Please email me (profmdwhite@hotmail.com) with your proposal and any questions about the meetings by November 1. (This is slightly earlier than usual to allow any papers not accepted in the ASE sessions to be submitted to the general conference by its deadline of November 15.)


Call for papers: Special issue of Œconomia on externalities

Mark D. White

I'd like to bring to your attention a fascinating call for papers from the journal Œconomia, a relatively new journal examining the history, philosophy, and methodology of economics:

 

Externalities in economic thought and beyond

Editors of the special issue : Steven G. Medema and Samuel Ferey

Expression of interest: November 15th, 2013

Deadline for submission: September 1st, 2014

Planed publication of the issue: 2015

 

Over the last sixty years, the concept of externality has become prominent within economics. It is common knowledge that the concept was first discussed by Marshall and then given an analytical content by Pigou (1920) in The Economics of Welfare, in which he analyzed the divergence between marginal private interest and marginal social interest in case of a negative externality and proposed to implement a tax system on polluting activities. Since Meade's (1952) now classic presentation of the effect of an externality through the fable of the apple grower and the beekeeper, the concept of externality has gained visibility in mainstream economic analysis. It has fostered a vast literature and many debates between economists intent on refining the definition and the actual scope of the concept. [Read More]


Call for papers: Association for Social Economics sessions at 2014 ASSA meetings

Mark D. White

As the program chair for the Association for Social Economics sessions at the 2014 Allied Social Science Associations meeting in January 2014, I am pleased to announce the call for papers:

Association for Social Economics

Call for Papers

Allied Social Science Associations Annual Meeting
Philadelphia, PA, January 3-5, 2014

THEME:  Exploring the Relationships between Law and Social Economics

Social economics has long emphasized the inherent social nature of the economy, stressing that the ties that bind people together in the economy have essential effects on economic outcomes (and vice versa). Law is also a social institution that regulates and influences how people relate to each other, including its effects on economic transactions and other related social interactions. In other words, law should be an integral part of social economics, and this conference theme hopes to enhance and highlight this.

In terms of economics, law is best established within the mainstream traditions of law-and-economics. But there is a need for this paradigm, based almost solely on neoclassical economic principles, to be supplanted by a social economics outlook. There are already efforts on the part of legal scholars to question neoclassical law-and-economics (such as the law and socio-economic movement and behavioral law-and-economics) as well as areas stressing the social aspects of law (such as law-and-society). Social economics has an tremendous opportunity to contribute to this reorientation of economic thinking within the law.

For the ASE sessions at the 2014 ASSA meetings we welcome proposals for papers on all aspects of social economics, especially those dealing with the law. Possible law-related topics include:

  • In what ways can social economics offer an improved economic analysis of law?
  • How have social economics addressed legal issues in the past, either directly or indirectly?
  • How can social economists incorporate legal concepts into their work? Many substantive topics of interest to social economists, such as inequality, poverty, and discrimination have important legal components that affect social-economic outcomes.
  • What general topics in legal studies could benefit from a social economics approach? Such as:
    • Contract law (based on promise, consent, efficiency, etc.)
    • Property (individual versus collective orientation, issues of taxation, etc.)
    • Criminal punishment (justified by deterrence, retributivism, rehabilitation, etc.)
    • Judicial decision-making (based on rights, efficiency, social justice, etc.)

To submit a paper or a session, please go to the proposal submission area of the ASE website (under Conferences > ASSA > Proposal submissions). Submission deadline is April 30, 2013.

Individuals whose papers are accepted for presentation must either be or become members of the Association for Social Economics by July 1, 2013, in order for the paper to be included in the program.  Membership information can be found at socialeconomics.org.

All papers presented at the ASSA meetings are eligible for the Warren Samuels Prize, awarded to the best paper that advances the goals of social economics and has widespread appeal. Papers can also be considered for a special issue of the Forum for Social Economics. Details of these opportunities will be sent to authors of accepted papers.